Take a bite into these wonderfully aromatic cinnamon-coconut sugar coated cookies. Dairy-free and grain-free, they’re a fantastic healthier cookie option that are brimming with flavor. These cookies would make a great lunchbox addition for children, after school snack, or fun weekend treat to share with friends and family.

Cinnamon is particularly good for helping diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, indigestion, flatulence, and arthritis. Cinnamon is known to help prevent and shorten the duration of the flu as well to eliminate congestion and mucus from the body. It is also very beneficial for lowering cholesterol and to help regulate blood sugar. It is known to help increase circulation and contains anti-clotting compounds, which makes it highly beneficial for helping to prevent strokes and coronary artery disease.

It is also very good for reducing inflammation in the body making it helpful for people with autoimmune disorders such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Cinnamon also has the amazing ability to stop yeast infections, candida, and menstrual cramps.

In America, a cookie is described as a thin, sweet, usually small cake.  By definition, a cookie can be any of a variety of hand-held, flour-based sweet cakes, either crisp or soft.  Each country has its own word for “cookie.”  We know as cookies are called biscuits in England and Australia, in Spain they’re galletas.  Germans call them keks or Plzchen for Christmas cookies, and in Italy there are several names to identify various forms of cookies including amaretti and biscotti, and so on.  The name cookie is derived from the Dutch word koekje, meaning “small or little cake.”  Biscuit comes from the Latin word bis coctum, which means, “twice baked.”

According to culinary historians, the first historic record of cookies was their use as test cakes.  A small amount of cake batter was baked to test the oven temperature.

The following three statements are all true: Eating cookie dough can be dangerous, even after we’ve dealt with any raw eggs.

If it seems implausible that all three of those statements can be simultaneously true.

To start, when most people think about health risks and cookie dough, they think about raw egg. Eggs can be contaminated with salmonella bacteria, and food safety recommendations encourage people to cook eggs until the white and yolk are firm in order to kill any bacteria.

Instead, we use eggs that have been pasteurized to kill any harmful bacteria without actually cooking the egg itself. (A great public health innovation, if you ask me!) So, I wasn’t worried about the eggs in the cookie dough.

Now, there is another risk to consider in relation to raw cookie dough: the risk of the flour itself. Over the past two months, General Mills, Inc. first initiated and then expanded a voluntary recall of flour found to be contaminated with E. coli bacteria. While contamination of raw flour is rare, it can happen. Wheat grows in fields close to animals. When they “heed the call of nature,” as the FDA put it, wheat can become contaminated. In this recent outbreak, 38 people have been sickened since December 2015 and some have been hospitalized because they ate the recalled flour raw, often in the form of cookie dough. One went into kidney failure.